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If you thought all you had to worry about in the food and drink industry was cooking up the best menu or serving the popular brands of beer, you’ve got a thing or two coming to you. The liability risks involved are immense – so big, in fact, that without the proper protective coverage, you could lose everything you worked so hard to build up.

Though you certainly can conjure up possible ‘what if’ scenarios, I’ve eased the process for you by listing genuine claim examples. While they might have occurred to another restaurant or bar owner, there’s a strong likelihood that something similar can happen to you as well.

Insurance Claim Samples

• A regular patron at a popular eatery walked into the establishment. As he made his way to the corner table, he slipped on the freshly mopped flooring and injured his foot. The man filed a $12,000 lawsuit against the restaurant.

• The waitress that worked in a restaurant served the chicken salad sandwich which a customer had ordered. The woman took her first bite and let out a shriek. She had chipped her front tooth on a small bone. The woman required extensive dental work. She brought a $1,700 damages and losses claim against the restaurant owner.

• As the waiter at a fancy restaurant made his way through the tables, he spilled the glass of soda he was holding. The problem was that the liquid ruined a patron’s laptop computer. The customer filed a $5,000 lawsuit against the establishment.

• The wire connected to an electric industrial mixing machine developed a short circuit. As a direct result, the cardboard boxes lying near the mixer caught on fire. The losses that were incurred totaled $15,000.

• While a pizza patron was sitting upon a stool, one of the legs dislocated. The customer fell of the chair onto the floor, incurring a head injury. Total medical bills amounted to $21,000.

• A neighborhood pub used a couple of portable heaters to warm up the outer beer garden. When a brawl between customers began, one heater was pushed on top of decorative ribbons, igniting a fire that mushroomed up to the open roof, causing much damage. The beer garden had to close for an extended time while $15,000 worth of repairs took place.

• A hail and wind storm damaged a portion of a bar’s roof. Then, a severe rainfall resulted in flood damage to the floor. The bar owner needed to buy protective tarping to cover the roof. It was only after fourteen days that a roof contracting company could actually begin repair work. Repair costs totaled $18,000, tarp costs amounted to $500 and business interruption for the month’s duration came to $16,000.

You’ve been given the claim examples. Now, imagine what would happen without the essential commercial coverage. Case closed.

Why the Restaurant or Bar Business Owner Needs Insurance

Why the Restaurant or Bar Business Owner Needs Insurance